Ethnic density effects on health and experienced racism among Caribbean people

Researchers including PMH member Laia Bécares conducted a new cross-national study that examined how differences in the context of migration and reception of Caribbean migrants have lead to the racialisation of black Caribbean people and their neighbourhoods in the US and in England. The study focused on ethnic density effects, which propose that as the proportion of a racial/ethnic minority group in a neighborhood increases their health complications decrease, and compared the association between ethnic density, health and experienced racism among Caribbean people in the US and in England. In the US, increased Caribbean ethnic density is associated with improved health and decreased experienced racism, but the opposite occurs in England. On the other hand, increased black ethnic density is associated with improved health and decreased experienced racism of Caribbean English, but not of Caribbean Americans. Findings suggest that different racialised identities in the US and England can be observed in the wider structural racialisation of place.

For more information see:
Bécares, L. Nazroo, J., Jackson, J., & Heuvelman, H. (2012). Ethnic density effects among Caribbean people in the US and England: a cross-national comparison. Social Science & Medicine, Part Special Issue: Place, migration & health. Volume 75, Issue 12, pages 2107-2115.